Kirkpatrick Charter Conversion On Hold Over Technicality
The state charter authorizer at one point would have allowed applicants to come directly to the panel with proposals for any part of the state. Image courtesy North Georgia State

Kirkpatrick Charter Conversion On Hold Over Technicality

The state charter authorizer at one point would have allowed applicants to come directly to the panel with proposals for any part of the state. Image courtesy North Georgia State
MNPS announced last week the district would hand over Kirkpatrick to KIPP Academy to begin conversion to a charter school in the fall, starting with kindergarten and first grade. Image courtesy North Georgia State

The decision to hand over East Nashville’s Kirkpatrick Elementary to charter school operator KIPP Academy was put on hold Tuesday night.

The Metro school board approved the charter conversion back in June without naming a low-performing school in need of a turnaround. That was supposed to be left up to superintendent Jesse Register, a point that was discussed but not included in the vote.

“Even though the board members talked about letting the administration make a recommendation, that was not the motion that was made, so the right thing for us to do is to bring it back for another vote,” Register said.

A vote will be held in January. In the meantime, the district plans to hold a series of community meetings.

Another charter decision is expected this week. On Friday, the state-run Achievement School District will announce whether it is taking over Madison or Neely’s Bend middle school. The ASD has faced resistance from parents and teachers at both sites.

David Wright Smith contributed to this report.

Blake Farmer

Blake Farmer is WPLN's assistant news director, but he wears many hats - reporter, editor and host. He covers the Tennessee state capitol while also keeping an eye on Fort Campbell and business trends, frequently contributing to national programs. Born in Tennessee and educated in Texas, Blake has called Nashville home for most of his life.
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