Fort Campbell Soldiers On Ebola Mission Swing Hammers In Liberia
Fort Campbell soldiers from the 902nd Engineer Company begin to build the Buchanan Ebola Treatment Unit in Liberia. Credit: DVIDS

Fort Campbell Soldiers On Ebola Mission Swing Hammers In Liberia

Fort Campbell soldiers from the 902nd Engineer Company begin to build the Buchanan Ebola Treatment Unit in Liberia. Credit: DVIDS
Fort Campbell soldiers from the 902nd Engineer Company begin to build the Buchanan Ebola Treatment Unit in Liberia. Credit: DVIDS

Fort Campbell soldiers wearing hardhats and fatigues have already gotten to work in Liberia building Ebola treatment units.

In video released by the Department of Defense, Pfc. Andrew Fisher – who is an Army carpenter – grips a hammer as other service members are stooped over, nailing platforms for massive tents.

“We’re putting together a floor system for another tent we’re putting up,” Fisher says. “We’re also going to see if we can put up a big fess tent, which will be one of the tents that will hold some patients.”

Most of the 700 soldiers who’ve deployed with the 101st Airborne have been told they should not come into direct contact with Ebola patients. But some Fort Campbell soldiers, like members of the 194th Military Police Company, will at least be working closely with native Liberians.

“We’re going to do force protection for U.S. forces out here and policing operations just like we do at home station in the U.S.,” Capt. James Hannabass says.

Fort Campbell soldiers have not been given a specific return date, but the deployment is expected to last six months. Currently, the Pentagon is also requiring a 21-day isolation to ensure soldiers haven’t contracted Ebola. But the Defense Department has said it will review the policy in mid-December.

Blake Farmer

Blake Farmer is WPLN's assistant news director, but he wears many hats - reporter, editor and host. He covers the Tennessee state capitol while also keeping an eye on Fort Campbell and business trends, frequently contributing to national programs. Born in Tennessee and educated in Texas, Blake has called Nashville home for most of his life.
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