Late Surge In Tennessee’s Early Voting, But Totals Are Still Down
Voters wait in line to cast a ballot early in La Vergne. While there was a surge on the final day of early voting, totals are still well behind 2010 and even further behind 2006. Credit: Blake Farmer / WPLN

Late Surge In Tennessee’s Early Voting, But Totals Are Still Down

Voters wait in line to cast a ballot early in La Vergne. While there was a surge on the final day of early voting, totals are still well behind 2010 and even further behind 2006. Credit: Blake Farmer / WPLN
Voters wait in line to cast a ballot early in La Vergne. While there was a surge on the final day of early voting, totals are still well behind 2010 and even further behind 2006. Credit: Blake Farmer / WPLN

Even though only a few hundred voters a day were showing up during the first few days in Davidson County, more than 13,000 people voted on the final day of early voting.  In Rutherford County, 4,600 people went to the polls – nearly double the number who voted Monday. (See the county-by-county totals here)

David Ashworth stood in line to vote at the La Vergne civic auditorium around lunchtime. He said he always votes but didn’t know enough about some local candidates to make an educated choice.

“I’m willing to do some of the research, but at the same time, I feel like it’s their job to make their positions known,” Ashworth said. “Why would I give someone a free vote?”

Statewide, there has been less campaigning than normal. There has been almost no publicity for the governor’s race, and while the U.S. Senate contest has received some attention, incumbent Republican Lamar Alexander is expected to win easily.

Spending on ads in this election cycle has remained relatively low, with the most money going into Amendment 1, which would allow the state to further regulate abortions.

In total, 609,000 Tennesseans voted early. That’s down substantially from 2010, when 718,000 voted early. In 2006, 850,000 voters cast their ballots early.

Election Day is Tuesday.

Blake Farmer

Blake Farmer is WPLN's assistant news director, but he wears many hats - reporter, editor and host. He covers the Tennessee state capitol while also keeping an eye on Fort Campbell and business trends, frequently contributing to national programs. Born in Tennessee and educated in Texas, Blake has called Nashville home for most of his life.
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